Current Economic Burden

About the Economic Burden Study

The economic analyses for the Burden of Occupational Cancer study were led by the Institute for Work & Health. The analyses look at healthcare costs, productivity and output costs, and quality of life costs at a societal level. The economic estimates represent the total lifetime costs of newly diagnosed cancers in the year 2011.

The results provide an economic argument for investing in prevention. The economic burden of each cancer case goes beyond the cost of treatment, impacting individuals and families, workplaces, and society.

Results

 Occupational exposure   Number of cancer cases (2011)*   Total cost of new cases (2011)† 
Asbestos 1900 lung
430 mesothelioma
$2.35 billion
Diesel exhaust 560 lung
200 bladder (suspected)
$684 million
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons 130 lung
50 skin
80 bladder (suspected)
$183 million
Radon 190 lung $185 million
Second-hand smoke 130 lung $129 million
Silica 570 lung $562 million
Solar UV radiation 4560 skin $34.2 million
Welding fumes 310 lung $308 million

*Economic costs were not calculated for all cancer sites. Only sites included in the economic evaluation are listed.
Economic estimates represent the total lifetime costs of newly diagnosed cancers in the year 2011, in Canadian dollars. Costs for subsequent years may vary based on the number of newly diagnosed cancers.

Economic Burden Resources