Research News


Ontario Ministry of Labour’s Integrated Health and Safety Strategy

December 17, 2013 - 9:55 am

Ontario’s first integrated workplace health and safety strategy was published on December 16, 2013.

Building capacity: IDRC grant awarded for international partnership

October 16, 2013 - 3:53 pm

The Occupational Cancer Research Centre (OCRC) is a collaborator on a new project applying Canadian expertise in occupational exposure surveillance to research in Latin America and the Caribbean. Funded by the International Development Research Centre’s Canadian Partnerships Program, with additional contributions from project partners, the initiative will see OCRC join hands with CAREX Canada, the …

Burden of Occupational Cancer: Project Update

August 08, 2013 - 2:06 pm

A two-day working meeting of the burden investigators was held in Toronto on July 29-30, 2013. This was the first project meeting with investigators from each of the four project components in attendance. Our study involves researchers from across Canada (Calgary, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver) and from the UK, with expertise in epidemiology, exposure assessment, health …

IARC classifies diesel engine exhaust as carcinogenic to humans

June 13, 2012 - 4:11 pm

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified diesel engine exhaust as “carcinogenic to humans” (Group 1) on June 12, 2012. The Working Group concluded that there was sufficient evidence that diesel engine exhaust is a cause of lung cancer in humans, and limited evidence of an increased risk of bladder cancer due to …

Shiftwork survey results are now available

February 08, 2012 - 12:01 pm

The Occupational Cancer Research Centre and the Institute for Work & Health held a survey about workplace practices to prevent injury and illness due to shiftwork. The results of the survey are now available, and can be viewed here. For more information on shiftwork-related projects and events at the OCRC, see our Projects page.

IARC Monographs Volume 100C: Arsenic, Metals, Fibres, and Dusts

December 08, 2011 - 10:27 am

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has published a monograph that evaluates the carcinogenic hazard to humans of arsenic, metals, fibres, and dusts. Download IARC Monographs Volume 100C: Arsenic, Metals, Fibres, and Dusts

Incorporating Occupational Information in Electronic Health Records: Letter Report

October 06, 2011 - 10:00 am

The Committee on Occupational Information and Electronic Health Records, appointed by the Institute of Medicine at the request of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), has recently investigated the feasibility of incorporating occupational information into electronic health records. The resulting report, including recommendations on how to achieve this goal, was published by …

OCRC researcher profiled by the Canadian Cancer Society

October 06, 2011 - 9:30 am

Dr. Shelley Harris was recently funded by the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) to investigate the relationship between the risk of breast cancer in young women and occupational and environmental exposure to flame retardant chemicals. Dr. Harris’s research was profiled by CCS in October for breast cancer awareness month. To read more about the Canadian Cancer …

IARC Monographs Volume 98: Painting, Firefighting, and Shiftwork

October 21, 2010 - 9:55 am

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has published a monograph that evaluates the carcinogenic hazard to humans of painting, firefighting and shiftwork. Download IARC Monographs Volume 98: Painting, Firefighting, and Shiftwork

Occupational exposures increase risk of lung cancer in never-smokers

July 28, 2010 - 5:29 pm

A recent study published in BMC Cancer demonstrated that exposure at work to potential cancer-causing agents is associated with increased lung cancer risk in the total population and an even higher risk amongst those who have never smoked. More specifically, never-smokers who were exposed to solvents, paints or thinners, welding equipment or smoke, soot or …